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184 Main Collins Street West Victoria 8007

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Come hungry leave happy. Jump into ‘Devour’ with a set menu of all things stuffed. Each course invites you to send your tastebuds into culinary havoc. From jalapeño poppers to cannelloni, rounding out with donuts two ways, devour the night before it devours you.

To top it off we’re BYO as usual with no corkage 😉

Bookings are essential

Traditional Hand rolled dumplings

Serving Size: 2 per person

The Story

Chinese cooks have enjoyed a version known as Jiaozi for more than 1,800 years. According to legend, Chinese stuffed dumplings were invented during the Han Dynasty by a man named Zhang Zhongjian. The event occurred when Zhang returned to his ancestral village during the winter, after a long absence. He noticed that many of his fellow citizens were suffering from frostbite, particularly around their ears. As a way to solve this problem, Zhang cooked up a batch of mutton, chilli and healing herbs and wrapped them in scraps of dough. He folded the dumplings to look like little ears, boiled them and handed them out to his afflicted neighbours. Who knows if they cured frostbite, but the villagers loved the taste of Zhang’s creation so much that they kept making the dumplings long after spring vegan.

DUMPLINGS---comp'd

Classic American Burger Sliders

The Story

New Haven resident Louis Lassen is credited with creating the first hamburger in 1900. Answering a customer’s rush order for something “quick and delicious,” Lassen assembled a hamburger from ingredients intended for steak sandwich production. Using the materials at hand, he sandwiched broiled, ground beef between toasted bread and the offered the customer a new creation, one whose local popularity would grow into a national phenomenon. Though the business has been housed in different structures and moved several times, the Lassen family continues to prepare hamburgers using the same methods that had satisfied the hurried customer’s request. The restaurant is so popular that when, in 1974, its owners faced eviction to make way for New Haven’s sweeping urban renewal program, New Haven residents protested.

Forbidden Fried Rice from Asia

The Story

Black rice, also called forbidden rice or “emperor’s rice,” is gaining popularity for its high levels of antioxidants and superior nutritional value. Forbidden rice earned its name because it was once reserved for the Chinese emperor to ensure his health and longevity, and forbidden to anyone else. Forbidden rice is a medium-grain, non-glutinous heirloom rice with a deep purple hue and a nutty, slightly sweet flavour. This whole-grain rice is rich in anthocyanin, which are antioxidant pigments that give the rice its unusual colour. Relative to other rice varieties, forbidden rice is high in protein and iron; according to Chinese medicine, it is considered a blood tonic.

Spicy Tamales from Mexico

The Story

The first tamales were made as early as 7,000 B.C., before corn had been fully domesticated. Indigenous people gathered wild “teocintle,” the ancestor of modern maize. From the start the tamale had religious significance. For the Aztecs, Teocintle was the name of a maize god. The Olmec, Toltec and Mayan civilizations of ancient Mexico shared creation myths that identified people with corn. Before the Spanish conquest, tamales were an important ritual food, offered to various gods at their appointed festivals. The Mexica and Azteca people offered bean tamales to the jaguar deity Texcatlicpoca and shrimp ones to Huehueteotl, the Lord of Fire.

Roasted strawberries with strawberry sorbet from Spain

The Story

Antonio Latini was the first person to write in detail about making and serving ices, which he included in his two-volume work, Lo scalco alla moderna, or The Modern Steward (1692 and 1694). He wasn’t a Neapolitan native, but did spend the last ten years of his life working as first minister to the Spanish viceroy in Naples. He prefaces his recipes for ‘various kinds of sorbets or iced waters’ by telling his readers that he does not intend to ‘invalidate the knowledge’ of anybody who already knows how to make sorbetto, stressing that ‘here in Naples, it seems that everyone is born with the skill and instinct to make sorbet.’

Come hungry leave happy. Jump into ‘Devour’ with a set menu of all things stuffed. Each course invites you to send your tastebuds into culinary havoc. From jalapeño poppers to cannelloni, rounding out with donuts two ways, devour the night before it devours you.

To top it off we’re BYO as usual with no corkage 😉

Bookings are essential

Traditional Hand rolled dumplings

Serving Size: 2 per person

The Story

Chinese cooks have enjoyed a version known as Jiaozi for more than 1,800 years. According to legend, Chinese stuffed dumplings were invented during the Han Dynasty by a man named Zhang Zhongjian. The event occurred when Zhang returned to his ancestral village during the winter, after a long absence. He noticed that many of his fellow citizens were suffering from frostbite, particularly around their ears. As a way to solve this problem, Zhang cooked up a batch of mutton, chilli and healing herbs and wrapped them in scraps of dough. He folded the dumplings to look like little ears, boiled them and handed them out to his afflicted neighbours. Who knows if they cured frostbite, but the villagers loved the taste of Zhang’s creation so much that they kept making the dumplings long after spring vegan.

DUMPLINGS---comp'd

Classic American Burger Sliders

The Story

New Haven resident Louis Lassen is credited with creating the first hamburger in 1900. Answering a customer’s rush order for something “quick and delicious,” Lassen assembled a hamburger from ingredients intended for steak sandwich production. Using the materials at hand, he sandwiched broiled, ground beef between toasted bread and the offered the customer a new creation, one whose local popularity would grow into a national phenomenon. Though the business has been housed in different structures and moved several times, the Lassen family continues to prepare hamburgers using the same methods that had satisfied the hurried customer’s request. The restaurant is so popular that when, in 1974, its owners faced eviction to make way for New Haven’s sweeping urban renewal program, New Haven residents protested.

Forbidden Fried Rice from Asia

The Story

Black rice, also called forbidden rice or “emperor’s rice,” is gaining popularity for its high levels of antioxidants and superior nutritional value. Forbidden rice earned its name because it was once reserved for the Chinese emperor to ensure his health and longevity, and forbidden to anyone else. Forbidden rice is a medium-grain, non-glutinous heirloom rice with a deep purple hue and a nutty, slightly sweet flavour. This whole-grain rice is rich in anthocyanin, which are antioxidant pigments that give the rice its unusual colour. Relative to other rice varieties, forbidden rice is high in protein and iron; according to Chinese medicine, it is considered a blood tonic.

Spicy Tamales from Mexico

The Story

The first tamales were made as early as 7,000 B.C., before corn had been fully domesticated. Indigenous people gathered wild “teocintle,” the ancestor of modern maize. From the start the tamale had religious significance. For the Aztecs, Teocintle was the name of a maize god. The Olmec, Toltec and Mayan civilizations of ancient Mexico shared creation myths that identified people with corn. Before the Spanish conquest, tamales were an important ritual food, offered to various gods at their appointed festivals. The Mexica and Azteca people offered bean tamales to the jaguar deity Texcatlicpoca and shrimp ones to Huehueteotl, the Lord of Fire.

Roasted strawberries with strawberry sorbet from Spain

The Story

Antonio Latini was the first person to write in detail about making and serving ices, which he included in his two-volume work, Lo scalco alla moderna, or The Modern Steward (1692 and 1694). He wasn’t a Neapolitan native, but did spend the last ten years of his life working as first minister to the Spanish viceroy in Naples. He prefaces his recipes for ‘various kinds of sorbets or iced waters’ by telling his readers that he does not intend to ‘invalidate the knowledge’ of anybody who already knows how to make sorbetto, stressing that ‘here in Naples, it seems that everyone is born with the skill and instinct to make sorbet.’